What Would You Do If You Had The Freedom?

Quit Your Job & Start a Passive Income Stream By Selling On Amazon

Get Your Free Video Guide
What Would You Do If You Had The Freedom?
Quit Your Job & Start a Passive Income Stream By Selling On Amazon
Get Your Free Video Guide
FACT 1:
No experience needed
FACT 2:
No need to quit your job now, start as a hobby for just 2 hrs a day
FACT 3:
Doesn't require thousands in savings, start small $300-$1000 is enough
FACT 4:
Amazon's marketplace is over 2 million sellers
FACT 5:
Sellers makes $$ thousands in profit every month
FACT 6:
Anyone can join these sellers
FACT 1:
No experience needed
FACT 2:
No need to quit your job now, start as a hobby for just 2 hrs a day
FACT 3:
Doesn't require thousands in savings, start small $300-$1000 is enough
FACT 4:
Amazon's marketplace is over 2 million sellers
FACT 5:
Sellers makes $$ thousands in profit every month
FACT 6:
Anyone can join these sellers

Get Your Free Video Guide

14 Minute Powerful Video Jam Packed with Everything You'll Need!

- Learn how to capitalize on Amazon's marketplace!
- Learn about what you'll need!
- Discover your steps to start!
Get Your Free Video Guide
14 Minute Powerful Video Jam Packed with Everything You'll Need!

- Learn how to capitalize on Amazon's marketplace!
- Learn about what you'll need!
- Discover your steps to start!

Success Stories
Shimmy/Josh
They have seen their sales grow to over $100,000/year!
The Morris brothers started as humble sellers of knick-knacks, but are now successful Amazon sellers and coaches. They have seen their sales grow to over $100,000/year! They now teach others how to succeed on Amazon.
David
AMZScout saved him time and ultimately helped him earn over $175,000/Month!
Once an Ebay hustler, David hopped onto selling on Amazon train almost immediately. But beginning in a time with minimal data research resources wasn't easy! AMZScout saved him time and ultimately helped him earn over $175,000/Month!
Rishabh
Rishabh began his Amazon FBA business and quickly began seeing over 6,000 in sales per month!
After combing the internet for passive income ideas, Rishabh began his Amazon FBA business and quickly began seeing over 6,000 in sales per month! About to launch his second product, he is happy he asked himself "If other sellers can do it, why can't I?"
Success Stories
Shimmy/Josh
They have seen their sales grow to over $100,000/year!
The Morris brothers started as humble sellers of knick-knacks, but are now successful Amazon sellers and coaches. They have seen their sales grow to over $100,000/year! They now teach others how to succeed on Amazon.
David
AMZScout saved him time and ultimately helped him earn over $175,000/Month!
Once an Ebay hustler, David hopped onto selling on Amazon train almost immediately. But beginning in a time with minimal data research resources wasn't easy! AMZScout saved him time and ultimately helped him earn over $175,000/Month!
Rishabh
Rishabh began his Amazon FBA business and quickly began seeing over 6,000 in sales per month!
After combing the internet for passive income ideas, Rishabh began his Amazon FBA business and quickly began seeing over 6,000 in sales per month! About to launch his second product, he is happy he asked himself "If other sellers can do it, why can't I?"

A Brief Guide to Quitting Your Job

Knowing when it's the right time and leave and understanding the best ways to do it.
Starting a new job is hard. Leaving a job can be even harder.

Think about all that is involved in and implicated by the decision to quit your job: your personal and professional relationships, your finances, and sometimes even your sense of self.

That is why it is so important that you handle your departure decision with such care.
Approached the right way, leaving a job can leave you feeling good and better off. If it is dealt with improperly, however, your departure can leave a bad taste in your mouth and impact your career for years to come.

With that in mind, here are a few things you should know if you're considering leaving your job or have already made the decision to.

How to Quit a Job

The first thing to keep in mind is the approach you take to quitting your job. In other words, the mechanics of quitting should be carefully thought through and orchestrated.
Telling to boss and colleagues
One dimension to this decision is the order in which you tell your boss and colleagues about your departure. In general, it is best to begin by telling those that will be most impacted by your decision. Typically that means starting with your supervisor, then informing your colleagues who are lateral to you on the organizational chart, and finally informing the entirety of the company.
Considering the interpersonal dynamics
With that said, the particular approach you take will be dictated by the size of your organization and any interpersonal dynamics that are particular to your firm. For instance, if you work at a small not-for-profit organization with a staff of four, it may make sense for you to break the news to everyone at the same time. Similarly, if you work at a Fortune 100 company with 50,000 employees, it is impractical and likely not advisable to inform the entire company of your separation.
Announcing in person
Another consideration around the mechanics of your departure is the method by which you break the news. In this day and age, we tend to deprioritize face-to-face meetings and personal touches but, with news of this magnitude, it will typically be a good idea to announce your decision in person.
Ways to announce your decision
Where appropropriate and necessary, it may make sense for you to make the announcement in the context of a meeting with multiple individuals. For instance, you may want to break the news to your supervisor during a one-on-one meeting and subsequently hold a division-wide meeting in which you share the information with multiple colleagues at once. Again, however, you ability to announce the news in person may be constrained by the size of your organization. At some point, if your organization is large enough, you may need to resort to a mass e-mail or have the news travel through the grapevine as necessary.
Two weeks rule
A final dynamic around the mechanics of your departure is the amount of notice you provide your employer. Generally speaking, the rule of thumb about "two weeks' notice" holds up: if possible, you should tell your company of your intention to depart at least two weeks before your planned departure date.
In many cases, however, two weeks should be viewed as a floor rather than a ceiling. That is, you should try to give your employer more advance warning if possible. The loss of you as an employee is quite disruptive to your employer: you may possess unique institutional knowledge, manage relationships with vendors or clients, or serve as the repository of critical paperwork. In turn, it takes time to transition these functions to another individual, particularly if the departure comes as a surprise. Given that, your employer will typically appreciate it if you should flexibility about your departure date and work collaboratively with them to arrive at a mutually-agreeable separation date.

Reasons to Quit Your Job

The section above provided some advice on how to quit. In this section, we want to offer you guidance on why you might want to in the first place.
At the end of the day, there is no right or wrong reason to quit a job. You can be motivated to leave by any number of reasons, and even any combination of reasons, some of them positive and some of them decidedly negative.
What Would You Do If You Had The Freedom?
Start a Passive Income Stream By Selling On Amazon
Get Your Free Video Guide
What Would You Do If You Had The Freedom?
Start a Passive Income Stream By Selling On Amazon
Get Your Free Video Guide
With that said, here are a few of the most common reasons why individuals choose to leave:
Major life changes
One perfectly valid reason for leaving a job is that you and your family is experiencing major life changes. If you or your partner has a new child, if you or your loved one falls ill, or if you decide to move to another part of the world, it will often make sense to reorient your and/or your loved ones' relationship with your current work.
Negative work environment
You may also feel motivated to leave your role if you feel that you are suffering with and from a negative work environment. This can take a variety of forms: you may find yourself being managed by an unreasonable boss, have a co-worker that does his best to sabotage your work, or be simply in unpleasant or unsafe conditions. If you find yourself confronting this situation, there may be opportunities to improve or address the issue before you pull the plug, but if you have already attempted to do so and things continue to fester, it may be time to leave.
No longer feeling challenged or growing in the role
Third, you may find that a role that once was stimulating and allowed you to grow as a professional is no longer meeting that need. Hopefully, you work at an organization and in an environment with a career ladder that allows you to take on progressively more responsibility over time and, better yet you've benefited from that. Even so, at some point, you may find that you have "maxed out" on your current role and at your organization, such that the only way you can move ahead in your career is to jump ship.
Opportunities for advancement elsewhere
The converse of not feeling challenged in your current role is having the opportunity to pursue advancement elsewhere. That is, another organization may reach out to you and make you an offer that, in the words of Marlon Brando, you simply cannot refuse. This new role may be more attractive when it comes to, for example, your scope of work, your salary, and/or your title, and there is nothing wrong with leaving in order to progress professionally in this way.
Opportunities for professional development
Last and related, it may make sense for you to separate from you role in order to pursue more formal professional development opportunities. You may feel, for instance, that in order to "move up, you need to step down." In other words, perhaps the ticket to the next step on your professional journey can only be purchased through graduate school or a vocational program.

Best Way to Quit a Job

At the beginning of this article, we discussed the mechanics of leaving your job. In this section, we want to build on that with slightly more detail.
Specifically, when it comes to delivering the news about your separation to your supervisor and colleagues, there are a few tips and tricks to keep in mind.

Tips & Tricks When Quitting Your Job:

Be direct and forceful
If you have made the decision to leave you role, then it is important that you say so explicitly when you are sharing the news. Rather than say, when it comes to your departure, "I am thinking about it," or "I may," state unequivocally that "I have decided."
Be flexible
If your departure comes as a surprise to your colleagues, their immediate thought, after their disappointment subsides, is how they will manage the transition and replace you. To that end, where possible, make clear to them that you are happy to be flexible about the details of your transition (with respect to, for example, your departure date). Better yet, come to the conversation armed with ideas about how to soften the blow.
Be kind
Even if you have made the decision to leave because you are unhappy with your colleagues and/or your work, it is likely not in your or anyone's interest to air your grievances when you are announcing your separation. To be sure, there is value in offering candid feedback and constructive criticism to your employer, as this offers them the opportunity to improve in the future. This is not the time, however, to burn your bridges. Doing so will get you nothing in the present and may haunt you in the future. Make sure you have the chance to stay on good terms.

Quitting a Job Without Notice

So far in this article, we have discussed the correct and best ways to quit a job.
We want to spend a brief moment touching on one way that all experts agree is the wrong way to quit a job. And that is leaving a job without notice.
Certainly, there are some limited number of circumstances where you may need to leave a job without notice. If you or a loved one suddenly gets sick or face acute mistreatment at the hands of your organization, you may have no choice but to quit without notice.

But these situations are few and far between. In the vast majority of circumstances--even in situations where you dislike your work--you are better off quitting your job using the best practices we have outlined above. To rephrase what we mentioned a moment ago, doing so will help them maintain a good impression of you both at the time of your departure and, perhaps surprisingly, well into the future.

How to Quit a Job You Just Started

If quitting a job without notice has a close cousin, it is quitting a job you just started.
Leaving soon after you assume a new role will be frowned on by your colleagues and supervisor in much the same way leaving without notice does. It is easy to understand why: your employer had been anticipated that it could carry out a certain type and amount of work with your help, and your sudden about-face has left them in a lurch, unable to easily do so.
In fact, in some ways, leaving soon after you start is even worse, from the perspective of your employer, than leaving hastily. And that is because they have incurred costs, in the form of time and resources, getting you trained up and operating at full capacity. Since you are not staying for long, they will not realize the corresponding benefits they expected to reap.

For these reasons, except under the extenuating circumstances we mention above, we recommend treading very carefully when it comes to quitting a new job.
What Would You Do If You Had The Freedom?
Start a Passive Income Stream By Selling On Amazon
Get Your Free Video Guide
What Would You Do If You Had The Freedom?
Start a Passive Income Stream By Selling On Amazon
Get Your Free Video Guide
Have any questions? Feel free to contact us.

Tel:
+1 908 428 4921
WhatsApp: +7 916 408 3672
Email: support@amzscout.net
Have any questions? Feel free to contact us.

Tel:
+1 908 428 4921
WhatsApp: +7 916 408 3672
Email: support@amzscout.net
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